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SETA Talk: What They Do to Help. Use Them Now

SETA Talk: What SETAs Do For You. What is a SETA? What does a SETA do? There are 21 SETAs. Every year each SETA must commit to funding specific programmes to boost skills in their respective economic sectors.

SETA Talk: SETAs play an important labour market function

The Sectoral Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) are responsible for managing the skills development initiatives within specific economic sectors. The SETA labour market function is to promote skills development and ensure that the skills and qualifications of the workforce meet the current and future needs of the economy.

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SETAs do this by:

  1. Designing and funding training programs: SETAs develop and fund training programs that are specific to the needs of their respective sectors.
  2. Providing bursaries and scholarships: SETAs provide financial support to individuals to pursue training and education programs.
  3. Registering and accrediting training providers: SETAs register and accredit training providers to ensure the quality of training programs.
  4. Developing and maintaining skills development frameworks: SETAs develop and maintain skills development frameworks that outline the skills and qualifications needed for specific occupations in their respective sectors.

Designing and funding training programs: SETA Talk

One of the primary roles of the SETAs is to develop and fund training programs that are tailored to the needs of their respective sectors. This involves identifying the specific skills and knowledge required for different occupations within the industry and developing training programs that provide these skills. The SETAs work closely with employers, labour unions, and other stakeholders to ensure that the training programs are relevant and up-to-date.

New SETA Occupational Certificates: SETA Talk

Working under the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations, the different SETAs have developed new occupational and trade focussed certificates:

  • NQF. Level 1 and 2 for those with little or no high school and limited if any work experience.

Use the SAQA website to search for registered NQF Qualifications

  1. When you open Qualifications registered on www.saqa.za they will state the SETA responsible for the qualification in the table at the top.
  2. Scroll down to the bottom of the qualification till you find the list of registered skills programs and qualification providers.
  3. Contact these providers and the SETA.
  4. Google the qualification title and NQF level in order to find other providers that SAQA has been too lazy to upload.

Providing bursaries and scholarships: SETA Talk

The SETAs also provide financial support to individuals who wish to pursue training and education programs in their respective sectors. This includes bursaries and scholarships that cover the costs of tuition, textbooks, and other related expenses. These programs are designed to support individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds who may not otherwise have the means to pursue training and education. Click here to see how ETDPSETA has organised their funding awards for 2023/4.

Registering and accrediting training providers: SETA Talk

In order to ensure that the training programs provided are of high quality, the QCTO and SETAs are responsible for registering and accrediting training providers. This involves evaluating the providers to ensure that they meet certain standards, such as having qualified trainers and appropriate facilities. Once a provider is accredited, it can offer training programs that are recognized and accepted by the industry.

Developing and maintaining skills development frameworks: SETA Talk

The SETAs are also responsible for developing and maintaining skills development frameworks for their respective sectors. These frameworks outline the skills and qualifications needed for specific occupations within the industry, as well as the pathways for individuals to acquire these skills. They provide a clear structure for skills development and ensure that training programs are aligned with industry needs. The frameworks are regularly reviewed and updated to ensure that they remain relevant and up-to-date.

SETAs play a crucial role in ensuring that the South African workforce has the necessary skills and qualifications to contribute to the growth and development of the economy.

The SETAs are Developmental

SETAs provide opportunities for the unemployed, youth and poor. These opportunities are directly linked to industry needs and demands. Look for scarce skills in order to find the jobs that industries are most desperate to fill and where funding is more likely.

While SEAs are largely developmental in nature, they fail at Pro-poor policy standards

SETAs are supposed to be pro-poor but this is not always the case. Pro-poor policy means an organisation designs systems and processes that are inclusive of everyone. When we assess SETA websites, we observe that information is difficult to find. An unemployed youth or adult looking for opportunity would mostly not know how to use a SETA website to obtain useful information such as:

  1. currently available learnerships and skills programmes
  2. accredited provider contacts
  3. registered qualifications

Some Pro-poor efforts at SETAs

It’s only fair to raise something positive. SETAs are getting good at assisting new providers. Now this is not a well-supported view, but dealing with provider accreditation is often as pro-poor as a SETA gets! We have a long way to go before we can vouch for pro-poor approaches towards youth and the public at large.

But when it comes to SETA accreditation, the wheels have moved in the right direction. Services SETA offers a free consultation for organisations considering accreditation or launching into the process. They, along with AGRISETA have been giving training content away for free to new providers for many years.

How the 21 SETAs are Arranged

Firstly, SETAs fall under the QCTO. That’s because the qualifications sought after by the labour market are related to trades and occupations. In other words, the QCTO and ‘their’ SETAs are in charge of all qualifications and skills programmes related to jobs.

The 21 SETAs are organized by the industry sector to provide education, training and skills development programs for employees and job seekers in various economic sectors.

Each SETA covers a specific economic sector, and they are responsible for identifying skills development needs within their sector, developing skills programs, accrediting training providers and implementing skills development initiatives in partnership with employers, training providers and the government.

The 21 SETAs and their respective sectors are as follows:

  1. AgriSETA – Agriculture Sector Education and Training Authority Latest AGRISETA Qualifications
  2. BANKSETA – Banking Sector Education and Training Authority BANKSETA Qualifications and Training Providers
  3. CETA – Construction Education and Training Authority Qualifications for the Construction Industry
  4. CHIETA – Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority CHIETA training contacts
  5. CATHSSETA – Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority
  6. ETDPSETA – Education, Training and Development Practices Sector Education and Training Authority How ETDSETA is addressing Education Vacancies in 2023
  7. EWSETA – Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority Energy and Water SETA Qualifications
  8. FASSET – Financial and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority
  9. FOODBEV SETA – Food and Beverage Manufacturing Industry Sector Education and Training Authority
  10. FP&M SETA – Fibre Processing and Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority
  11. HWSETA – Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority HWSETA Qualifications and Career Portal
  12. INSETA – Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority
  13. LGSETA – Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority
  14. MICT SETA – Media, Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority
  15. MERSETA – Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority
  16. MQA – Mining Qualifications Authority
  17. PSETA – Public Services Sector Education and Training Authority
  18. SASSETA – Safety and Security SETA
  19. SERVICES SETA – Services Sector Education and Training Authority
  20. TETA – Transport Education and Training Authority
  21. W&RSETA – Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority

Each SETA is overseen by a board of directors, with representatives from the government, labour unions, employers and education and training providers. They are funded through a levy-grant system, where employers in each sector pay a mandatory skills development levy that is used to fund training and development initiatives within their industry sector.

How do SETAs obtain funding?

The funding for the SETAs comes from a mandatory skills development levy paid by employers in each sector.

The levy is collected by the South African Revenue Service (SARS) and then distributed to the relevant SETAs based on the number of employees and the size of the payroll of each employer in the sector.

The skills development levy is currently set at 1% of an employer’s total payroll, with exemptions for employers with a payroll below a certain threshold. The levy is meant to encourage employers to invest in the training and development of their employees and to promote the development of a skilled workforce in each sector.

Other Funds

In addition to the skills development levy, SETAs may also receive additional funding from government grants, donor funding, and other sources. These funds are used to support specific skills development projects, such as bursaries for individuals, research and development, and the development of new training programs.

The funds collected by the SETAs are then used to support various skills development initiatives, including the development and funding of training programs, the accreditation of training providers, the provision of bursaries and scholarships, and the development and maintenance of skills development frameworks. The SETAs are required to ensure that the funds are used effectively and efficiently to promote skills development in their respective sectors.

SETA Registration, Accreditation and Certification

The South African government established the Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) in 1998 to provide skills development programs for employees in various sectors. SETAs play a vital role in facilitating skills development by registering, accrediting, and certifying employers, assessors, moderators and learners.

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Registration, certification, and accreditation are essential terms in the SETA framework.

  • Registration refers to the process of enrolling in a skills development program to acquire knowledge and skills.
  • Certification refers to the process of obtaining a certificate or qualification after completing a skills development program.
  • Accreditation refers to the process of recognizing an institution to deliver a program. Accredited organisations are regarded as having met specific standards and requirements set by the QCTO and relevant SETA.

Employer Registration:

Employers who want to participate in skills development programs must register with the relevant SETA in their sector. The employer registration process requires submitting documentation such as tax clearance certificates and proof of payment of the Skills Development Levy. Once registered, employers can claim back a percentage of the Skills Development Levy paid to SETA through the submission of Workplace Skills Plans (WSP) and Annual Training Reports (ATR).

Assessor and Moderator Registrations:

Assessors and moderators play a critical role in the skills development process.

They are responsible for assessing learners’ competence in various fields of study. Assessors must register with SETA to ensure that they meet the relevant requirements for assessing learners. The registration process for assessors involves providing proof of their qualifications, industry experience, and competence in the relevant field of study. Assessors must also complete the relevant assessor training program before they can register as constituent assessors with a SETA.

Moderators must register with the relevant SETA to ensure that they meet the relevant requirements for moderating assessments. The registration process for moderators involves providing proof of their qualifications, industry experience, and competence in the relevant field of study. Moderators must also complete the relevant moderator training program before they can register with SETA or QCTO.

Learner Registration:

Learners are individuals who enrol in skills development programs to improve their skills and knowledge. Learners must register with the relevant SETA in their sector to access funding for their skills development programs. The registration process for learners involves completing the necessary application forms and providing supporting documents such as ID copies and qualifications. Learners can access information on their registration status through the National Learner Records Database (NLRD), which is a central database for learner information.

Accreditation:

SETAs also accredit institutions for programs that provide skills development programs. Accreditation ensures that the institution or program meets the relevant standards and requirements set by a SETA. The accreditation process involves evaluating the institution or program’s quality, content, and delivery methods. Accreditation information is available on all SETA websites or can be obtained directly from any SETA office.

Certification:

Certification is the process of obtaining a certificate or qualification after completing a skills development program. SETAs issue certificates and qualifications to learners who have completed a program that meets the SETA’s standards and requirements. Certificates and qualifications can be verified through the NLRD or by contacting the relevant SETA.

In conclusion, SETA registration, accreditation, and certification are critical components of the skills development framework in South Africa. Employers, assessors, and learners must register with SETA to participate in skills development programs. Institutions and programs providing skills development programs must also obtain accreditation to ensure that they meet the SETA’s standards and requirements. Learners who complete a program receive certification, which can be verified through the NLRD or by contacting the relevant SETA. Information on SETA registration, accreditation, and certification is available on the SETA websites or can be obtained directly from SETA offices.

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Leonie Hall

Leonie Hall, disruptive thinker and dynamic strategist, is an expert in education, development, quality management and innovation. She has spoken at local and international conferences; and currently works as an independent consultant and content developer. Contact Leonie for a consultation.

This Post Has One Comment

  1. Limakatso

    I would like to know on how can I apply for seta stipend as i am already doing my internship but with no stipend

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